Student Presentations

University of Central Arkansas Students will present during this time

 

Foster Care and Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (15 minutes)

Mackenlea Gipson, B.S., is a graduate student in Speech-Language Pathology at The University of Central Arkansas.
C. Alise Holloway, B.S. is an audiology graduate student at the University of Memphis.
Mary Dean Johnston has a B.S. from the University of Central Arkansas.
Hannah Waid, B.S., is a graduate student in Speech-Language Pathology at the University of Central Arkansas.

 

In the United States, the number of children reared in foster care is growing including children with disabilities such as Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Approximately 7-10% of children in foster care are diagnosed with ASD and children with ASD are about 2.4 times more likely to be placed in foster care as compared to their neurotypical peers (Family for Children with Developmental Disabilities, 2019). One of the prominent contributing factors for children with ASD being placed in foster care is the socioeconomic status (SES) of the family. Children who have autism are more susceptible to being in foster care for a prolonged amount of time due to the financial costs of treatment and the extra care needed to provide for children with ASD. Some children are placed in foster care at a young age and oftentimes they are placed with multiple foster families throughout their life. Additionally, there are racial and ethnic disparities in prevalence and diagnosis among low SES children. (Durkin et al., 2017). Research supports a strong correlation between environmental factors and performance in many types of disorders, including ASD. The development of children with ASD is affected by parenting styles, socioeconomic status, culture, and parent involvement (Carmo et al., 2019; Levin et. Al, 2015). Regarding intervention for children with ASD in foster care, an emphasis should be on family-centered treatment in order to engage an individual’s immediate community in their care and facilitating their goals (American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, 2020). The field of communication sciences and disorders is just beginning to explore the area of foster care and its effects on children with ASD. This study identifies some of the barriers facing this clinical population so that health care providers, caregivers, and parents can begin to help children with ASD overcome them and improve their quality of life.

Disclosure for M. Gipson, A. Holloway, M Johnston, H Waid

 Financial Relationships: None
Non-financial Relationships: None

 

Identifying Barriers to Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in CSD Undergraduate and Graduate Programs (30 minutes)

Mackenzie Jordan is a junior CSD major at the University of Central Arkansas. She has been a part of NSSLHA for 2 years and is a Student Representative for the CSD Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Committee. Mackenzie also serves on the Steering Committee for the creation of the AR Black Association for Speech-Language, and Hearing. Mackenzie also helps Dr. Elizabeth Cleveland in her lab for the CSD Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Committee.
Abigail Moss is a junior CSD major at the University of Central Arkansas. She is an active NSSLHA member and is a Student Representative for the CSD Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Committee. Abigail also serves on the Steering Committee for the creation of the Central Arkansas affiliate chapter of the National Black Association for Speech-Language and Hearing.

 

With the increase in student stress over the past year, a group of students from the University of Central Arkansas partnered with the CSD Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Committee to create a survey for undergraduate and graduate students. The survey consisted of several questions focused on perceptions of college, gender and racial diversity, and barriers to accessing resources. Results from this study indicated that most students value diversity, equity, and inclusion. However, Students of Color had a disproportionately higher number of roadblocks related to monetary needs (i.e. lack of transportation, job needed during school, etc.) than White students. This, among other factors identified in this survey, may create more stress for Students of Color and should be evaluated in each CSD department.

Disclosure for M Jordan and A Moss

 Financial Relationships: None
Non-financial Relationships: None

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