Student Presentations

Honors Internship: Aphasia Reading Club (15 minutes) University of Arkansas

Clare Kellough, an undergraduate at the University of Arkansas. I am majoring in Communication Sciences and Disorders and my minors include Human Development and Family Science (HDFS) and Medical Humanities. I was initially very interested in traumatic brain injury before learning more about aphasia and internship opportunities. My other interests in the field include cognitive impairment and disorders that affect daily activity.

 I have taken the internship approach for my honors project. For the project, I attend a two-hour "book club" for individuals with aphasia. I have attended a reading club for adults with aphasia for a minimum of 22 weeks in the spring and fall of 2021. The sessions are organized by graduate students at the University and the patients receive both individual and group therapy. In my presentation, I will discuss what I have learned about aphasia and its effects on individuals through completing my literature review. Then I will present what I have learned from completing my internship and how that information compares to the information collected from research.

Disclosure

Financial Relationships: None
Non-financial Relationships: None

 

Spelling and Song: Utilizing Music Mnemonics Within the Barton System (15 minutes) Arkansas State University

Abby Antici completed her undergraduate degree in May 2021, graduating In University Honors with a B.S. in Communication Disorders from Arkansas State University. For this research, she drew upon her skills as a musician to write lyrics to the tune of popular songs to accompany rules found in the Barton Reading and Spelling System. Abby is working toward her Master’s degree in Communication Disorders at A-State, where she plans to further her research into the potential for utilizing music as an additive to traditional therapy practices.

 

Music can have a positive impact on learning. A pre-test/post-test study design was utilized to determine whether utilizing music as a mnemonic device improved the spelling skills of students using the Barton Reading and Spelling System (BRSS). Six participants enrolled in the Literacy Intervention Program at the A-State Speech and Hearing Center participated. The participants were divided and matched based upon their grade levels and levels of completion in the BRSS. For eight weeks, the experimental group was shown videos containing songs covering the rules in the BRSS while the control group was shown videos containing spoken explanations of the rules. A pre-test/post-test spelling assessment was utilized to determine the participants’ whole word accuracy, the percentage of letters in error, and the number of specific errors present (e.g., insertions, deletions, and substitutions). The pre-test results suggested that the control and experimental groups were statistically different prior to the introduction of treatment despite being matched based on grade and BRSS book level. This difference persisted in the post-test results. Overall, both groups showed improvement in spelling accuracy. The use of song did not hinder learning, but it could not be determined to be the only factor related to spelling improvement.

Disclosure

Financial Relationships: None
Non-financial Relationships: None

 

Neurogenic Stuttering as a Symptom of Concussion in Collegiate Athletes (15 minutes) Arkansas State University

 Kayleigh Hennemann, a student in Arkansas State University’s Master of Communication Disorders program. She relocated to Jonesboro, Arkansas after completing her undergraduate degree at New Mexico State University. Following the completion of her graduate degree, She hopes to work in an acute care setting and continue to expand on her knowledge base of this wonderful field.

 

The purpose of this investigation is to determine a possible relationship between concussions and neurogenic stuttering. A brief, 10-question survey regarding prior concussions and the presence of neurogenic stuttering symptoms following the concussions was developed for data collection. Participants include Arkansas State University student-athletes who participate in basketball, football, rugby, and soccer. These sports were chosen due to the high contact that is experienced. Data collection will be completed by August 2021.

Disclosure

Financial Relationships: None
Non-financial Relationships: None

 

Title: The Effect of Voice Demand on the Perception of Voice in Collegiate Athletic Coaches (15 minutes) Arkansas State University

Olivia Metzgar is a second-year graduate student completing her Master of Communication Disorder at Arkansas State University. She is under the mentorship of Dr. Christina Akbari. Olivia has completed fieldwork and clinical experiences in both the rehabilitation and early intervention settings. Upon completion of her graduate degree, she hopes to complete her clinical fellowship in an inpatient setting while becoming certified in FEES, PROMPT, and VitalStim therapy approaches.

 

A study was conducted to examine the effect of occupational voice demand on the perception of vocal qualities and voice changes in Division 1 collegiate athletic coaches in the state of Arkansas. A survey consisting of demographic questions and the Voice Capabilities Questionnaire (Buckley et al., 2018) was sent to the coaches. Preliminary results suggest that coaches often experience a variety of vocal changes that include vocal fatigue, hoarse vocal quality, voice breaks, difficulty increasing vocal volume, difficulty projecting voice, and an increased need to throat clear or cough. Participants did not report preexisting voice conditions, which suggests the vocal changes can be attributed to factors related to occupational voice demand experienced during the current season of coaching.

Disclosure

Financial Relationships: None
Non-financial Relationships: None

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